Volume 8, Issue 2 (Spring 2019)                   JOHE 2019, 8(2): 65-75 | Back to browse issues page

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Khosromehr A, Davoodi S R. The hazards of pedestrian mobile-phone use when crossing signalized intersections, Iran (2017); an observational study . JOHE. 2019; 8 (2) :65-75
URL: http://johe.rums.ac.ir/article-1-339-en.html
1- Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Golestan University, Gorgan, Iran.
2- Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Golestan University, Gorgan, Iran. , davoodi76ir@gmail.com
Abstract:   (29 Views)
Background: Distracted walking is a major cause of pedestrian fatalities. Along with the expansion and popularity of mobile phones, their impacts on pedestrian safety, especially when crossing urban intersections have attracted a lot of attention. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of mobile-phone use on pedestrians’ crossing behavior when passing signalized intersections.
Materials and Methods: An observational study was conducted to compare the behavior of pedestrians using mobile phones (the reference group) with non-mobile phone pedestrians (the time-matched control group and the demographic-matched control group) crossing signalized intersections in 2017. For this purpose, the demographic information and walking behaviors of 513 pedestrians were observed. Furthermore, a binary logistic regression model was used to predict risky behaviors.
Results: Using mobile phones has a direct impact on the unsafe behavior of pedestrians crossing signalized intersections. Mobile-phone users showed significantly less safe behavior (14.6 times) than non-mobile phone users (p <0.001). Using mobile phones to talk had the greatest impact on the vulnerable behavior of pedestrians (p <0.001). SMS conversations and listening to music were in the next positions, respectively (p = 0.283).
Conclusions: Using mobile phones can often lead to the carelessness of pedestrians and their exposure to the possible risk of pedestrian-vehicle crashes. Applying the findings of the present research requires effective technologies and strategies to prevent the use of mobile phones by pedestrians at signalized intersections.

 
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Type of Study: original article | Subject: Occupational Health
Received: 2019/01/17 | Accepted: 2019/05/13 | ePublished: 2019/07/9

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